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Swiss man, 20, was left in intensive care after suffering rare lung injury from masturbating

Swiss man, 20, was left in intensive care after suffering rare lung injury from masturbating

A 20-year-old man was hospitalized after a freak accident while masturbating – the first of its kind.

The Swiss patient, who has not been named, suffered a rare lung injury usually caused by strenuous exercise or heavy coughing.

He spent one night in intensive care and another three days in hospital as doctors tried to relieve the pain caused by trapped air.

The man went to the emergency room after experiencing sudden chest pain and shortness of breath while pleasing himself in bed.

By the time he arrived, his face was swollen and cracking sounds could be heard from his neck to his arms.

Doctors diagnosed him with “spontaneous” pneumomediastinum (SPM), in which air leaks from the lung and becomes trapped in the rib cage.

They’re not sure how the injury came about, but noted, but noted that it’s most common in young men.

In his case, the trapped air had spread over his body and even down to his skull. In more extreme cases, it can cause a collapsed lung.

A handful of cases have been reported during sex, but never during masturbation.

A 20-year-old man suffered a rare lung injury while masturbating in bed, trapping trapped air in his chest, neck and arms (stock)

A 20-year-old man suffered a rare lung injury while masturbating in bed, trapping trapped air in his chest, neck and arms (stock)

Doctors who treated the patient at Cantonal Hospital in Winterthur said his case was “unusual.”

The story was revealed in Radiology Case Reports magazine.

The patient came to the hospital with “severe” shortness of breath, where he told doctors it started with a sharp chest pain while masturbating.

His medical history revealed that he had mild, untreated asthma and ADHD.

An X-ray showed he had “deep” amounts of air in his mediastinum, the space in the chest between the lung sacs, medically known as pneumomediastinum.

Escaped air had also traveled to other parts of his body, “up to the base of the skull.”

Doctors noted that his face was swollen and that cracking sounds could be heard when they pressed their fingers on his neck, chest and arms.

The patient denied using drugs or smoking and said he had not coughed or had strenuous exercise, making his case “spontaneous.”

He was transferred to the ICU where he was given oxygen support, acetaminophen and antibiotics to reduce his risk of infection.

When his condition improved overnight, he was transferred to a general ward and his chest pain persisted for three more days.

He was discharged on the fourth day and his condition was considered “uncomplicated.”

In the report, the medics write: ‘Predisposing factors are a history of smoking, acute asthma and recreational drug use (particularly cocaine and heroin).

‘Except for a history of mild, non-acute asthma, no triggers were noted in our patient.

“There are only a few reports of SPM related to sexual activity and we could not find any cases related to autoeroticism, which makes our case unusual.”

Spontaneous pneumomediastinum – what is it?

When air gets trapped in the mediastinum, the space in the chest between the lung sacs, it’s medically known as pneumomediastinum.

It can happen for a variety of reasons when the pressure in the lungs rises and causes the air sacs (alveoli) to rupture.

It can also occur as a result of direct damage to the lungs, which can cause air to leak into the chest.

The condition is usually not life-threatening.

The main symptom is chest pain, which can come on suddenly and be severe.

Other symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath (dyspnea)
  • difficulty breathing
  • cough
  • neck pain
  • vomit
  • difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • a nasal or hoarse voice

Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is the form of the condition that does not result from obvious trauma to the mediastinum or the lungs.

However, certain underlying health conditions or events can increase the pressure in the lungs and start the process that leads to SPM.

Smoking and drug use are central risk factors. It can occur after strenuous exercise, violent coughing fits or projectile vomiting – which put pressure on the airways.

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