Skip to content

How to check if your PC works with your VR headset

How to check if your PC works with your VR headset

While it seemed like a science fiction dream to most people not too long ago, the number of virtual reality applications isn’t slowing down and it’s starting to look like we might be close to living in the metaverse after all.

From immersive gaming experiences and diverse online chat rooms to virtual offices and digital dating, virtual reality is evolving into an enriching computing world.

While the Meta Oculus Quest 2 can operate independently, most other VR headsets still require a connection to a PC. And no old computers will do. You don’t need the latest $2000 Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090 Ti to run VR games and apps, but there are some strict standards your PC needs to reach to properly run a VR headset at the lowest resolution.

Before you run out and buy a headset, you’ll need to make sure your computer is up to the task.

Minimum Specifications Required for Most Popular VR Headsets

Every VR headset on the market will have different requirements to work properly with your PC. Here are the minimum specifications required to power some of the most popular VR headsets. (Obviously everything will run smoother the better your specs.)

LED indicator

  • Operating System: Windows 10 or higher, SteamOS, Linux
  • Healer: Dual core with multi-threading
  • memory: 8 GB RAM or more
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 970 / AMD RX 480 Equivalent or higher
  • Ports: DisplayPort 1.2 or higher and USB 2.0+

Oculus Quest 2

  • Operating System: Windows 10 or higher
  • Healer: Intel i5-4590 / AMD Ryzen 5 1500X or later
  • memory: 8 GB RAM or more
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 / AMD Radeon RX 400 Equivalent or Higher
  • Ports: 1 USB port

HTC Vive Pro 2

  • Operating System: Windows 10 or higher
  • Healer: Intel Core i5-4590 or AMD Ryzen 1500 equivalent or higher
  • memory: 8 GB RAM or more
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 / AMD Radeon RX 480 Equivalent or higher
  • Ports: DisplayPort 1.2 or above, USB 3.0 or later

HP Reverb G2

  • Operating System: Windows 10 or higher
  • Healer: Intel Core i5, i7/Intel Xeon E3-1240 v5/AMD Ryzen 5 equivalent or higher
  • memory: 8 GB RAM or more
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 / AMD Radeon RX 580 equivalent or higher
  • Ports: DisplayPort 1.3, USB 3.0 Type C

To get the minimum specifications for another headset, we recommend looking for the manufacturer’s FAQ page to ensure compatibility with your computer.

How do I know if my computer meets the minimum requirements?

It’s really easy to see exactly what you’re working with on your computer by looking at some of the settings menus.

The first thing you’ll want to check is your graphics card – the most important piece of hardware to run PC VR. We’re using Windows 11, but the menus should look similar on older Windows 10.

  • Open the Start menu and search for Settings, either by clicking the gear icon in the Installed apps section or searching for Settings using the search bar.
  • Click “System” in the left sidebar.
  • Click View in the System menu on the right.

You can find your graphics card information in the display settings.

  • Scroll down until you tap on the Related Settings section and tap on Advanced View.

You will have to scroll down a bit to find the “Advanced View” menu.

  • Under Display Information, you’ll see a list of any monitors connected to your computer along with the name of your installed graphics card listed next to it.

The graphics card model information will be listed just below the display information.

Now, we can track down the rest of the information you’ll need. Fortunately, the rest live in one place.

  • Go back to the main Settings menu and click “System” in the left sidebar.
  • Scroll down to the bottom of this list and tap About.

Click the About box inside the System app to view operating system information, available RAM, and more.

  • Under the Device Specifications section, you will be able to find the processor and RAM information.
  • Under the Windows Specifications section, you will be able to see which version of Windows your computer is running.

What about online performance tests?

If you’ve been surfing the Internet looking for tips on VR hardware, you’ve likely encountered software designed to test your PC’s VR capabilities – namely VRMark and SteamVR Performance Test.

Although these two programs will surely run smoothly and tell you whether or not your computer is VR capable, they were launched in 2016 and have not been updated regularly. Originally, they were designed to see if your computer could use the HTC Vive or the Oculus Rift, which are now outdated headsets.

If you’re picking up an old VR headset, give any of these quick hits a try. But if it gets an A+ rating, that doesn’t mean it can run the latest VR games on the Valve Index correctly. PC VR could be simpler, but with so many different VR headsets out there, you’ll have to do your research to make sure your device works with your PC.

Source link